cardboard freight building

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by joesho, Mar 20, 2007.

  1. joesho

    joesho Member

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    well,bigger is better,heres my newest! project,heres where i got insparation go to www.railroad-line.com,its the second post on the home page,any way here are some picture,btw this building is dont the same way as in shak fun a tutorial.(paper strips on cardboard :),also im not sure but i think im getting better at this whole scratch building thing :D

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  2. joesho

    joesho Member

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    common! eleven veiws,questions?,complements?, sugestions???
  3. ocalicreek

    ocalicreek Member

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    Nice color selection. Looking forward to seeing how it progresses.
  4. joesho

    joesho Member

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    thanks,your paper/cardboard creation is coming along
  5. joesho

    joesho Member

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    alright more progress on this building,ive got all the wall conected, and the roof made.im just making it dry strait,see for your selves.

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  6. nachoman

    nachoman Guest

    Nice work. Cardboard really is an excellent modeling material. After you attempt about half a dozen or so scratchbuilds, your skills will be noticably better than when you started. Pretty soon, you will be making more complicated things, like freight cars, ornate passenger stations, and water towers. Trust me, it's fun!

    Here is a hint I have learned - mix carpenters yellow glue with water about 50/50, and then brush it over the cardboard. It will soak in and make it stiffer and less "fuzzy". Lightly sand the surface after the glue mixture has dried with fine sandpaper to make it smooth, or with coarse sandpaper to leave a wood grain textrue.

    kevin
  7. Jim Krause

    Jim Krause Active Member

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    My only two comments would be; I like it and how about some reinforcement for the walls. I just finished a Campbell Scale Models engine house and had to add some additional reinforcement and a floor in the machine shop to keep everything square. I love old delapidated. buildings.
  8. joesho

    joesho Member

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    nachoman thanks for the tip that should help, and yes i am much better than when i started.i fact i still have my first try! :D
    Jim Krause it does have reinforcement on the walls but not on the ground,will do that after it dries,also,how many of you actaully went to the link i posted at the top?
  9. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    It looks great! I tried the link at the top, but it doesn't work. I've gotten a page saying that internet explorer can't open the web page both times I've tried it.
  10. joesho

    joesho Member

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    sorry bout that,here is the link www.railroad-line.com there hope this one works it the third thread down on home page,i believe its called qk18 bottle dealer. ANYWAY of to a grander note,my building is finnished,but one question,should i put advertisments on it and what should i name it (i want it to fruit related,oranges,peaches) so, any ideas?

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  11. ocalicreek

    ocalicreek Member

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    Here's a suggestion for your window mullions - an old trick from the modeling masters (John Allen, Ben King, et al). Use thread. Tape it across the window frame and tack it at the joints with CA only after you are certain the joints are square. The CA will wick into the thread giving it strength. If you find they are not square and you have begun gluing anyway, it's an easy step to rip it out and start again. It's just thread! Then after the glue is dry (CA makes clear styrene craze and haze) apply the window glazing from behind.

    Nice tip from Nachoman about the glue fuzzies - but how large a sheet are you talking about? What about warping? And he's right, with time you will get better, only if you are willing to look at your work with a critical eye (or let us at it here on The Gauge - the kindest, gentlest criticism you'll ever receive!)

    I've been working on/dreaming about a cardstock scoring/shaping tool to create wood grain effects and a clapboard siding effect. I'll let everybody know how it turns out, but I'm pretty psyched about it...however I won't really be able to work on it for a couple days, probably, with the work load and home projects lined up. It's a good thing I enjoy the 'other' things in life besides modeling.
  12. joesho

    joesho Member

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    Nice tip from Nachoman about the glue fuzzies - but how large a sheet are you talking about? What about warping? And he's right, with time you will get better, only if you are willing to look at your work with a critical eye (or let us at it here on The Gauge - the kindest, gentlest criticism you'll ever receive!)

    I've been working on/dreaming about a cardstock scoring/shaping tool to create wood grain effects and a clapboard siding effect. I'll let everybody know how it turns out, but I'm pretty psyched about it...however I won't really be able to work on it for a couple days, probably, with the work load and home projects lined up. It's a good thing I enjoy the 'other' things in life besides modeling.[/quote] ya is nt it a shame how life always gets in the way of modeling :D :rolleyes: sign1 . and btw i dont mind criticism helps me get better.
  13. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    What era and geographic location are you modeling? A produce warehouse served by both rail and trucks would have at least one loading dock with multiple doors. It would also have some sort of mechanical refrigeration unit either on the roof or next to the building. A lot of produce is kept out in an open dock in boxes under air conditioning, but some has to be kept under refrigeration. I'm not sure about the 1930's - 1950's, but they might have had tracks next to the dock on one side and a truck dock on the opposite side. By the time the interstate highway system was completed, most produce shipping had shifted to trucks, and the tracks would be on the same side as the trucks, but seldom if ever used.

    If it is a produce warehouse, there are a number of names you could use. Before I retired last year, some of the produce companies whose refrigeration equipment I worked on here in Los Angeles were, Coast Produce, G & G Produce, G & G was bought by Sysco and the name changed to Fresh Point of California, a trucking company whose reefers I worked on was named Cornucopia( I'm sure you can guess what their logo looked like) & Borg Produce. There is now a small institutional food distribution company I do work for on a part time basis named Newport Farms. There is also a company named L A Produce, I think. You could name it for the town it is in, for you if you ever wanted to own a business, or for a friend or family member, if you want to honor them. The only names I wouldn't use are the generic cartoon names like Acme or Ajax. It seems to me that every produce company I did work for had some sort of reason for the name chosen.
  14. joesho

    joesho Member

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    how 'bout sacremento valley growers?
  15. Play-Doh

    Play-Doh Member

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    Great work joesho, I myself am a huge fan of making buildings out of cardboard, or whatever you can find around the house. Its economical and challenging at the same time. Keep up the great work! I look forward to seeing your future projects!

    Play-Doh
  16. joesho

    joesho Member

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    thanks play-doh :D
  17. ocalicreek

    ocalicreek Member

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    Try roughing-up the slick surface with a bit of sand paper or a sanding stick (nail file) and applying pressure while the glue sets. If it's a place that won't be seen, use an additional piece of card or paper to reinforce the joint.
  18. WVRR

    WVRR Member

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    I found a neat trick for making your cerealboard not warp when you paint, glue etc. Go out and get a box of long square barbeque matches. Usually comes in boxes of 50 or more. Cut down to inside wall size, they make excellent framing for the inside to make sure the walls stay straight and also add massive strength to your structures. Also running them along the bottom makes a perfect frame height to put a floor on for those buildings that you can see into. Just a suggestion to an already great looking structure.
  19. ocalicreek

    ocalicreek Member

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    Barbeque matches! Now there's ingenuity! Great tip!
  20. Russ Bellinis

    Russ Bellinis Active Member

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    I think when Robin used to use the cereal board to make structures, he put the rough side to the inside where it was glued and left the glossy side out. He used paint to cover the graphics on the glossy side of the material.