card weight question - US weights.

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by keith, Apr 22, 2006.

  1. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    Keith

    Card stock weight is more of a density measurement then a thickness measurement. Generally 67/69 lb card stock will measure .008 to .0082 inches, 110 lb card stock measures around .0093 inches. These are average measurements I measure 5 to 8 sheets of stock and divide the measurement by the number of sheets.

    You also have to consider the glue thickness 3M77 spray glue adds .002 to .003 inches to each layer. White glue adds slightly less to the thickness say around .002 inches.

    I may be a bit of a fanatic on the thickness of card stock but I have found that accumulative errors in thickness of the stock will cause fit problems in a model.


    Jim Nunn
  2. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    Keith

    Card stock weight is more of a density measurement then a thickness measurement. Generally 67/69 lb card stock will measure .008 to .0082 inches, 110 lb card stock measures around .0093 inches. These are average measurements I measure 5 to 8 sheets of stock and divide the measurement by the number of sheets.

    You also have to consider the glue thickness 3M77 spray glue adds .002 to .003 inches to each layer. White glue adds slightly less to the thickness say around .002 inches.

    I may be a bit of a fanatic on the thickness of card stock but I have found that accumulative errors in thickness of the stock will cause fit problems in a model.


    Jim Nunn
  3. keith

    keith Member

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    I totally agree jim, i took 3 pieces of card, 210gsm, 300gsm and an unknown, they all came within .02mm of each other(the tollerance of my calipers).
    The measurment was 0.28mm (0.01 inches)
    The 210 is 'fluffy' general purpose card, the 300 gsm seems to be slightly compressed and waxy, the unknown is smooth and twice as stiff as the 210, it is printers card on a roll.
    i'll find my micrometer and take a proper measurement.

    i'll post an image of my first test model when i take a picture,
    My brains now being tempted with making an ultra miniture millenium falcon from layered card.
  4. keith

    keith Member

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    I totally agree jim, i took 3 pieces of card, 210gsm, 300gsm and an unknown, they all came within .02mm of each other(the tollerance of my calipers).
    The measurment was 0.28mm (0.01 inches)
    The 210 is 'fluffy' general purpose card, the 300 gsm seems to be slightly compressed and waxy, the unknown is smooth and twice as stiff as the 210, it is printers card on a roll.
    i'll find my micrometer and take a proper measurement.

    i'll post an image of my first test model when i take a picture,
    My brains now being tempted with making an ultra miniture millenium falcon from layered card.
  5. airbob

    airbob Member

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    Card stock weight

    Yep, Office Dept is the Place to get this stuff around here, 110lb from wally world is great for bigger models and I use this for the bulkheads, but the 65lb is a bit better and a little smoother and finished (Wausau) is better for the "curvy" parts and I even use the 32 pound stuff from Redriver for really tiny models....I like to build at the 1:120 scale and the fighters are "wee" at this scale....!
  6. airbob

    airbob Member

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    Card stock weight

    Yep, Office Dept is the Place to get this stuff around here, 110lb from wally world is great for bigger models and I use this for the bulkheads, but the 65lb is a bit better and a little smoother and finished (Wausau) is better for the "curvy" parts and I even use the 32 pound stuff from Redriver for really tiny models....I like to build at the 1:120 scale and the fighters are "wee" at this scale....!
  7. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    I use 90lb (165gram/m sq) for all my aircaraft. I do 1/24 scale and have found it stiff enough, but not too thick that it makes rolling small parts hard.
    For my M-48 tank I may go thicker however, or end up laminating much of the hull bottom and sides.

    John.
  8. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    I use 90lb (165gram/m sq) for all my aircaraft. I do 1/24 scale and have found it stiff enough, but not too thick that it makes rolling small parts hard.
    For my M-48 tank I may go thicker however, or end up laminating much of the hull bottom and sides.

    John.
  9. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

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    Office Depot Prices

    Michael and All,,

    The prices I had quoted before were actually an unadvertised sale to get rid of the supply to make room for a new supplier.

    The old stuff was Wausau and their new supplier Kodak.

    I went by to pick up more and the Wasau was all gone.
    If I had known that was what they were doing I would have bought a truckload at those prices.
    I called all the office Depot's within a 100 mile radius of my home and all were sold out. :(
    I cannot remeber how much the Kodak cardstock was but it was outrageous.

    I am now back at Walmart again.

    I keep an eye out on all the sale papers and am waiting for a good sale somewhere.

    Russell
  10. Amazyah

    Amazyah Senior Member

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    Office Depot Prices

    Michael and All,,

    The prices I had quoted before were actually an unadvertised sale to get rid of the supply to make room for a new supplier.

    The old stuff was Wausau and their new supplier Kodak.

    I went by to pick up more and the Wasau was all gone.
    If I had known that was what they were doing I would have bought a truckload at those prices.
    I called all the office Depot's within a 100 mile radius of my home and all were sold out. :(
    I cannot remeber how much the Kodak cardstock was but it was outrageous.

    I am now back at Walmart again.

    I keep an eye out on all the sale papers and am waiting for a good sale somewhere.

    Russell
  11. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    I've been using 110 lb paper put out by Georgia-Pacific. I bought it because it is lables as acid free. I also have 250lb Epson photography paper. I use the Georgia-Pacific for models because the photography paper is coated and the coating tends to get mared when I glue. I use the photography paper for errr making photographs of my models.
    I design my own. In making slots I've been making slot lines as 1 pt lines for one sheet of paper. I use Coreldraw and design my models as vector graphics. The nice thing is if I scale up the model the slot lines remain unaffected.This doesn't work as well for fitting a box shaped piece inside another box shape.
  12. lizzienewell

    lizzienewell Member

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    I've been using 110 lb paper put out by Georgia-Pacific. I bought it because it is lables as acid free. I also have 250lb Epson photography paper. I use the Georgia-Pacific for models because the photography paper is coated and the coating tends to get mared when I glue. I use the photography paper for errr making photographs of my models.
    I design my own. In making slots I've been making slot lines as 1 pt lines for one sheet of paper. I use Coreldraw and design my models as vector graphics. The nice thing is if I scale up the model the slot lines remain unaffected.This doesn't work as well for fitting a box shaped piece inside another box shape.