Building kits in humid conditions

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by mellotronage, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. mellotronage

    mellotronage Member

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    As the heat and humidity are not too far in the future where I live, I was wondering this:
    Have you ever decided not to work on your kit due to excessive humidity?

    During the summer months, my family goes to our camper/trailer on weekends. I will usually be in our outdoor screen-room building a model- paper, plastic, resin, whatever.....
    The area in which we live (southern New Jersey) can be excessively hot and humid in the summer.
    Should I think twice about building paper kits in these conditions?:???:
  2. MOS95B

    MOS95B Member

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    Based on gut instinct, I would say that I wouldn't work on something too complicated, or that I plan on making into a masterpeice...

    The humidity in the air would make me wonder what the paper would do once it dried out. Also, you might want to take a couple of types of glue. Bith the heat and humidity would mostly have an effect on the final bond.

    NOTE: None of the above is based on anything I can prove. Like I said, gut feeling
  3. rickstef

    rickstef Guest

    nope
    I live in Delaware, and we get the same heat and humidity, I have never stopped building a paper model in humidity

    Rick
  4. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    I have seen a couple threads on this same topic and its generally been agreed that it does not cause a problem.

    One person (sorry i forget who) suggests gluing one of those little silica gel pacs inside your model somewhere - not a bad idea if its a model that you realllllly wanna keep around for a long time :)
    Chris
  5. 46rob

    46rob Member

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    Under normal heat and humidity conditions, I wouldn't worry too much--but you're going to be camping, and that's a whole different scenario. Generally, humdity shouldn't be a problem--but, when it cools over night, and you get heavy condensation (dew)--make sure your models are protected from that. Keep them in plastic bags, like the cheap transparent ones they sell at places like Costco, for wastebasket liners when you're not wrking on them, or they're finished. Likewise, protect your printed sheets. Ever see a book exposed to excess humidity? Ruins them. Back in the really old days, down south, folks kept book presses in their houses, to keep the pages from warping.
  6. andrew ferguson

    andrew ferguson Member

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    i asked this same question a few months ago and all responses were that it would be no problem. :)
  7. hpept

    hpept Member

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    aferguson, I remembered a similar thread but not that it was yours. Like the other time, I can safely say that I had no major problem with humidity here (tropical place, 8 degrees below equator line, in front of the sea). If I got some warped model was because of my bad skills, not humidity.
    Mellotronage, about going camping and building model, I would say OK, just don't let the models out at night.
  8. John Griffin

    John Griffin Member

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    Humidity in a car

    I've left books out in my car overnight, and they got all warpy and wavy. I imagine that would happen to a card model too, with ruinous results unless they were enclosed in plastic. Out here in UT it's as dry as a bone, but I think that an enclosed car traps what moisture there is, whether it's from the air or the car's heating/cooling system, damp floor mats, etc.. Just a warning if you do take any models along while camping.
  9. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    I made a paper model of a 16" foot sailer boat I had ( about 8 inches long). I coated the boat before I painted it with liquid crazy glue. 10 years later the boat is straight as an arrow. I have never repeated the process as the cost to the environment was to great to justify the boat, but it worked.
  10. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    I made a paper model of a 16" foot sailer boat I had ( about 8 inches long). I coated the boat before I painted it with liquid crazy glue. 10 years later the boat is straight as an arrow. I have never repeated the process as the cost to the environment was to great to justify the boat, but it worked.