Build: Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero, 1:33, Halinski 3/2005

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by rlwhitt, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    And to round out tonight's lame offering, a shot of the drawings of a cylinder and the motor.

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  2. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Not yet, hopefully later tonight.

  3. milenio3

    milenio3 Active Member

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    Wow, Rick.
    Your work seems outstanding. Thanks for sharing your progress.
  4. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    How about now? Do you have any cuddly little cylinders to show us?
  5. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Progress has been slow. I've not had much free time to work on this and part of that I've spent helping son Alex get started on a Mały Hellcat - I'm having to be quite "hands on" with that, at least for now... :)

    Here we have my prototype cylinder. I wanted to build one all the way through to see how it went together and maybe guess about some sequences and such to make the rest easier. The remaining 13 will be built in a more "production line" fashion, so there won't be much progress to show until it's done. Each of these cylinders has 15 parts, some of them wicked small and tricky to bend!

    I came up with a good trick (well, I'm sure I didn't originate the idea, but I've not read it elsewhere yet). Sometimes I use white glue as a filler, but since it dries clear it's not so great. But I mixed just a little gray paint into it and it improves the "filling" capability greatly!

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  6. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    Those cylinders are nearly identical in style to the ones I made for my ki-115. I must say that the one you made is far superior. Super clean lines. Especially on those rocker arms. I can barely even hold those pieces let alone get them to glue together that nice. Your covers over the center section look great too (the inside of the v)
    Chris
  7. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Thanks! It took a REALLY long time!

    Rick

  8. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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    Rick,

    You might want to consider building several construction jigs to ease the work. The rocker covers are especially good candidates. You can make them out of cardboard (harden with CA) or wood. Melt wax over the surface to prevent glue sticking to them and keep a glass of water handy to dip and clean it between parts. It can really save time and reduce frustration. Same thinking goes for the "valley" pieces.

    Best regards,

    -Gil
  9. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    That sounds like a real winner Gil, I think I'll try that for the rocker covers as they were an asolute beast to get together. The valley parts were actually not hard at all!

    I think a circular one to form the lower cylinders would be a big help too.

    I'll post some pics of them if I end up with anything worth sharing...

    Thanks,
    Rick

  10. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    One down 13 to go! One way of precedeing is to build them up assembly line sytle with jigs and what not, just have your front 7 built as premier pieces then the others can be so-so, and heaven forbid not all the parts have to be there as they are not showing. It's just a matter of silencing that voice in the head that says you need to use all the parts in the kit or the world will start to wobble or something!
  11. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Running with the jig idea (thanks again Gil!) I thought I'd share how I'm doing them. The first one is for holding the lower cylindrical parts at the right size. Luckily one of the holes that my leather punch pliers makes was an exact fit - otherwise you'd have to hand cut the holes. I made a jig to do 6 at a time. I rolled the parts, stuffed them in and made sure edges were not overlapped and were even at the bottoms, then glued them from the inside. Then, little disks go in near the bottom of each cylinder. Let them dry, pop 'em out, and they were nearly perfect! And this REALLY speeded things up!

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  12. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    The next part is the Y-shaped upper part. It is circular at the bottom, and has a disk inside it as well, flush with the bottom. Again I punched a hole that would hold the bottom at the right diameter, glued from the inside. Next trimmed the little disk to be a fairly tight fit and stuffed it down until it hit the cutting mat, thus flush with the bottom of the cylinder part. Then I used a paint brush to coat the joint inside. I ended up cutting several holes and doing these 2 at a time and letting those dry while I did the next 2, etc.

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  13. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Here is a (flock, gaggle, covey?) of partial cylinders ready for the next step. All this only took about 3 hours when done with the jigs. (Yeah, I know that sounds like a long time, but I can promise you that this would have taken me double or triple that freehand).

    Toothpick shown for scale. These pesky things are SMALL!

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  14. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Next up is the little V shaped curved part that sits inside the upper part of the cylinder. I was not really sure I'd do a jig for these, as I found them to be pretty easy to get right on the test cylinder. But in the interest of research I tried to come up with something. I settled on this little box here, sized to get the things held together at the right angle plus squeeze the sides to the proper width.

    The hole is there so I can push the part out with a stick or something when it's set up a bit. Below the jig are the 3 parts for this step

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  15. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Then I form the 2 main parts into a curve and place them into the box together. I glue the little black part on top to join them.

    The 2 main parts are not glued to each other at this point. Once I pop them out, I then glue that joint from the back side.

    Like I said, I could probably have done without a jig on this step. Doing one at a time, it's not much faster, but I do think that so far it's helping to make them turn out better. And it sort of reduces the repetition to a mechanical, less frustrating thing. It pretty much works right every time, minimum of adjustment, that sort of thing.

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  16. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Finally a finished part, ready to join into the cylinder assembly.

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  17. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    With the risk of possibly offending ye gentleman of the south, that's Yankee inginuity! I'm filing all this stuff for my next radial, Thanks!
  18. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    No problem, as Yankee sort of got redefined as far as I can tell in a lot of people's minds to mean all Americans, like the Brit's and whatnot called us all Yanks in the war!

  19. cgutzmer

    cgutzmer Guest

    great info on how you use that jig - might fine indeed! And great results to boot - cant wait til you are done so I can archive it :) I amight split your little jig tutorial off into its own....
    Chris
  20. shrike

    shrike Guest

    Yankee derived from the Dutch "Jan Kase" (John Cheese) used as a derogatory term by the British for the previous settlers in New York (Amsterdam) and Pennsylvania.