Build: Goodyear F2G Super Corsair, 1:32, Gremir

Discussion in 'Aircraft & Aviation' started by rlwhitt, Jan 27, 2007.

  1. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Oh, and another thing. This talk of appropropriate engine detail reminded me to mention something else. To those that may find this plane interesting but are not big fans of building detailed motors, Will has provided a built-in option of not building it at all! There is a former for the front of the cowl that has a picture of a motor on it and you'd just glue the front cone part of the crankcase onto that and you're done. (You cut most of the inner part of the former out if you have the motor). Quite a nice touch I think.

    That, along with the options to not build separate/moveable control surfaces and extended flaps, make this a more approachable model for those not caring to go all out on the details.

    Rick
  2. wyverns4

    wyverns4 Member

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    Finally got myself one!

    After reading this build thread for the last few weeks, I decided to take the plunge and get one for myself! I'll have to go get new printer cartridges tommorrow, so hopefully I can get some printing done later. I am very interested in the engine, and may even build one to display on a stand, next to the completed model. Too nice of a motor to hide under the cowling!
  3. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Cool! Good luck!

    Rick

  4. Willja67

    Willja67 Member

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    Thank you Rick and Rick. This could get a little confusing.
  5. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Cowl

    Time to give the motor a home. Here are all the cowl parts.

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  6. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Here the "speed ring" (thanks for the terminology Will - where did that come from?) is done and preparing to put the inside liner (tabbed) part in. The ring with the hump goes inside it, and needs a few tabs cut off to make the fit.

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  7. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    The prevous bits together, with the cowl inner liner joined and ready.

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  8. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    The inner liner installed inside the tabs of the speed ring

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  9. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Here the cowl outer skin is installed and motor-firewall former stuffed in. I had originally shown the cowl outer skin joined before I really understood the sequence. Done the way I'm showing here the skin must be wrapped around.

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  10. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Here is the cowl assembly joined to the fueslage. I decided to wait and finish the air intake after putting the cowl on to give myself extra opprtunity for adjustments on the forward part.

    You can also see in this pic a possible dubious decision on my part to try to smooth the speed ring section by sanding, filling (thinned white glue) and painting it white. Frankly, I'm not sure I gained much and as a bonus the color mismatches a bit. I'm hoping the gloss coat hides this a bit, as it tends to do for other miscellaneous sins. ;)

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  11. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Intake done, wing fairings on, ready for the gloss laquer coat!

    Man, that's a long nose!

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  12. Willja67

    Willja67 Member

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    Don't know for sure I came across it when looking at the site of a guy who built an 83% Corsair replica and I've seen it a few times since.
  13. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    OK, I lied! One more part before the paint. Here are the rear deck parts behind the headrest.

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  14. Clashster

    Clashster Member

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    Great build and pictures, Rick! And great design, Will! I wish I could build as quickly as you, Rick. My updates seem to take longer and longer! The close up shot of the speed ring seems to be that dreaded macro mode (makes it look worse than it really is)! The pic from further away looks good and is probably more indicative of what you would see if you were in the room. Always enjoy your threads, looking forward to more progress! Thanks!

    Chris
  15. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Yeah, it does look a lot better at "1x", and with the whole thing glossed up a bit I think it'll be fine.

    Thanks!

  16. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    Great Nose job! It'll probably blend after a few gloss coats. I fall into that sand the curved parts and filler pitfall sometimes too. Most of the time, for me anyways, I don't get it matched up and then end up tearing it off and trying again. It does seem to work, alot of the models done on the Polish sites seem to have been done that way and look like the things were cast up or vacuformed. Just to say it again, looking good!
  17. shrike

    shrike Guest


    The Townsend ring cowling was one of the first effective methods of reducing the drag of a radial engine. Being an airfoil cross sectioned torus (hows that for technical?) that wrapped around the cylinder heads and smoothed airflow through and over the engine. Simple and effective they were termed "Speed Rings" in the popular press.
    The NACA (NASA predecessor) developed a much longer cowling that was amazingly efficient, often increasing speed by 10-15% and cutting fuel use by 20% with no other airframe modifications. NACA, being a publicly funded research organization made this information freely available immediately.
    The first people to use the new information were air racers who at first simply added an extended sheet metal cylinder to the existing ring cowl. It worked, but not as efficiently as a properly developed NACA cowl would, but set the terminology of the inner surface still being a "speed ring"
  18. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Thanks for the lesson! I seem to learn something about aircraft on every build - another good reason for build threads!

  19. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Exhausts installed. That artifact under the 4th one down looks like a big glue oops, but in fact it's the shiny surface reflecting my magnifying lamp!

    Obviously, the airframe now has been gloss laquered. I think it was a bit too cold where I was spraying and I did not get quite as smooth a surface as I'd like, but outside of macro range it looks OK.

    I must have done something wrong as the exhaust stacks seemed a good bit too long and I had to trim them. Perhaps I was supposed to cut holes in the firewall and poke them through before assembly? But I wanted to wait and put them in after gloss coat so they would stay flat brown. Anyway, no biggie.

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  20. rlwhitt

    rlwhitt Active Member

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    Previously built tail wheel mounted.

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