Artists or Inkjet fixative

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by Haereticus, Feb 6, 2012.

  1. Haereticus

    Haereticus Member

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    Has anybody ever tried using a fixative spray on paper parts before they are cut and folded, to prevent the ink loss that you get, particularly on mountain folds, during assembly and subsequent handling? I know that they're available as artists' fixatives and also specialised inkjet fixative. I was thinking of investing in a can for my next project but wondered if anyone had ever tried it and found it a waste of time.
  2. paper hollywood

    paper hollywood Member

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    Definitely buy a can and use it. I've used a fixative on all my model sheets since early on when I had a mishap. Inkjet inks are water soluble, so for permanence a model does need to be coated. I haven't heard of an inkjet-specific fixative before, but that sound like a good idea. Wade
  3. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Not all inkjets are water soluble. Only Dye based Ink printers are. The Epsons I use , use Pigment Ink which does not run and offers U.V. protection. There fore your models fade less. I have used Elmer's glue to seal wing tips by soaking them and forming the ends and the Pigment ink did not run. There may be chemicals that use Pigment Ink to run, that I am not aware of. It is always best to know what kind of ink your printer is using. You can Google that and find out quite easily. :)
  4. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    I don't get cracking in mountain folds. Please, if I offer any suggestions, they are just that, you may be doing them already, and they are just my opinion. I never fold a piece past what's necessary. This prevents the fibers from breaking and giving a rough edge. Scoring on the backside can relieve this pressure as it allows the bend without stretching the paper. It has even know for quite some time that while Laser printers provide extremely fine detail, they can flake and come off of the toner came come off of the model. There ay be some who know tricks around this, but I think a Pigment based, Inkjet printer is the best way. Actually, I believe models in white painted with paint is the best way, but that's another issue completely! :)
  5. Haereticus

    Haereticus Member

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    I tend to find that if I've been building a dark model, my fingertips are quite black after a while, which can be a problem if you don't watch it and avoid handling light parts.
    I'd also like to experiment with finishes. You can get artists' fixative in matt, satin and gloss, and I'd like to get a nice satin finish. It's possible it would be best to spray it on after the model is complete. I'll have a little play around...
  6. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    Do you get that with Pigment nksss? There are only a couple of things that could cuse that, A: it has not yet dried completely or B: it is dye ink. Pigment ink should not com off onto our fingers unless it is wet.

    I use ink from www.inkproducts.com. They source their ink from the Massachusetts Company which is the same place all the O.E.M.s use, the place is Massachusetts gets it from Dupont. I can guarantee this info is correct. If you go to this companies website, you will see a phone number and you can actually talk to a REAL person. I have been more than happy with their product and advice. They are the best. I have received any P.M.'s from members of this forum and papermodelers.com telling me how satisfied they have been with their product. Their prices are incredible! :)
  7. paper hollywood

    paper hollywood Member

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    Well, you've sold me on Epson. I'll probably get one after my Canon 850i gives out entirely. Still, a fixative is not a bad idea, I think. When I put hours of work into a project, I want as much protection as possible. I believe some modelers even hit the pages with a coat of clear varnish sometimes. You'd want to test it on a scrap first, of course. Perhaps someone has tried this and has a good brand name or two.

    Wade
  8. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    I know some people use Pledge Floor Wax (aerosol_ to make models shiny but I don't know if it protects the models. Many people use clear coats of paint. You have to lightly mist on the first few coats first before you go at it though, or it will destroy the printed surface..
  9. Haereticus

    Haereticus Member

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    I'm not sure what I've got that on - it may well have been due to impatience, and not letting the ink dry. I'm in the UK but thanks anyway for the tip about the website.

    EDIT - I actually varnished the first paper model I ever made, a helmet from the marines in Halo: Combat Evolved - but, again, I was impatient, and sprayed it with grey spray paint before the varnish (which I think was wood varnish) had fully dried, which lead to it bubbling up and being ruined. So... don't do that.
  10. paper hollywood

    paper hollywood Member

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    With any spray painting it's best to use multiple light coats rather than laying it on at all. This brings to mind a worthwhile subject for experimentation. I'm thinking for paper model pages, the best course would be 2-3 very light coats of fixative, followed by multiple (maybe 3-5) coats of clear varnish for maximum surface protection. I haven't tried varnishes myself, though, so don't take my word for it yet. With a heavy layer for clear finish, but might wise to even sand the glue flaps a bit before gluing, too.

    The floor wax should offer very good moisture protection. I may have to try that, too.

    Wade
  11. Zathros

    Zathros Guest

    And you get that Lemony Fresh scent too........................:p:twisted: