Architctural Models..How To???

Discussion in 'Tips, Tutorials & Tools' started by NYC Irish, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. NYC Irish

    NYC Irish Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    605
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wondering if anyone knew where there were a few tutorials or tips on making Models for shows and presentations like for an Architect...

    Seems like fun

    Thanks John John
  2. NYC Irish

    NYC Irish Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2004
    Messages:
    605
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was wondering if anyone knew where there were a few tutorials or tips on making Models for shows and presentations like for an Architect...

    Seems like fun

    Thanks John John
  3. GEEDUBBYA

    GEEDUBBYA Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0
    Howdy John,

    Well, Being a machinist, I work close with engineers where I work, and our engineers have been using a 3 dimensional printer for the past few years.
    It is the same thing that alot of architectural firms use now a days. The printer which my company bought, I was told, cost about $40,000, but it makes really large parts in 3 dimensions (a model).
    But, I see from this article found here:

    http://www.wohlersassociates.com/Jun01TCT.htm

    That 3d printers for the home arent too far off......of course you will have to mortgage the house to pay for the printer, but, hey, you have to do that to have kids too. (just get the printer instead of a kid).
    I know that doesnt really answer your question, but, I know some architects and will ask how they "used to do it". and get back with ya.


    have a good day,

    greg
  4. GEEDUBBYA

    GEEDUBBYA Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0
    Howdy John,

    Well, Being a machinist, I work close with engineers where I work, and our engineers have been using a 3 dimensional printer for the past few years.
    It is the same thing that alot of architectural firms use now a days. The printer which my company bought, I was told, cost about $40,000, but it makes really large parts in 3 dimensions (a model).
    But, I see from this article found here:

    http://www.wohlersassociates.com/Jun01TCT.htm

    That 3d printers for the home arent too far off......of course you will have to mortgage the house to pay for the printer, but, hey, you have to do that to have kids too. (just get the printer instead of a kid).
    I know that doesnt really answer your question, but, I know some architects and will ask how they "used to do it". and get back with ya.


    have a good day,

    greg
  5. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,093
    Likes Received:
    1
    I don't know, I come to this site to get away from the pressures of work (as a rapid prototyping technician) and what do I find, but you lot talking about rapid prototyping!! Is there no escape??!!!

    Seriously, these technologies are fantastic, and Terry Wohlers is right, they will filter down to something like a home desk top printer one day. Half of me says 'I can't wait', the other says 'Start looking for a new job....'.

    Actually, I think John was looking for pointers for designing card/paper models of buildings. Come on guys, we don't all make planes, cars and ships!!

    Tim P
  6. wunwinglow

    wunwinglow Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2004
    Messages:
    1,093
    Likes Received:
    1
    I don't know, I come to this site to get away from the pressures of work (as a rapid prototyping technician) and what do I find, but you lot talking about rapid prototyping!! Is there no escape??!!!

    Seriously, these technologies are fantastic, and Terry Wohlers is right, they will filter down to something like a home desk top printer one day. Half of me says 'I can't wait', the other says 'Start looking for a new job....'.

    Actually, I think John was looking for pointers for designing card/paper models of buildings. Come on guys, we don't all make planes, cars and ships!!

    Tim P
  7. bholderman

    bholderman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
    It took me a while to mull this one over, since I am struggling with initial step with my lighthouse.

    Although I am using the Fiddlers Green model as a base, a lot of the model told me that my original AutoCad attempts were at least iin the right direction.

    Thus, I would recommend heading over to HABS:

    http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/habs_haer/index.html

    Find something local and/or simple. Either print out a set of drawings and cut/paste/experiment with them or import into AutoCad and start Tracing. You do have to realize that at some point you will be looking for (a lot of online freebies) textures and what not as well which I apply in Photoshop.

    I consider myself as doing a rather simple building but dicovering its not just making a box.

    But alas, a little more time, I may add to the thoughts above.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  8. bholderman

    bholderman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
    It took me a while to mull this one over, since I am struggling with initial step with my lighthouse.

    Although I am using the Fiddlers Green model as a base, a lot of the model told me that my original AutoCad attempts were at least iin the right direction.

    Thus, I would recommend heading over to HABS:

    http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/habs_haer/index.html

    Find something local and/or simple. Either print out a set of drawings and cut/paste/experiment with them or import into AutoCad and start Tracing. You do have to realize that at some point you will be looking for (a lot of online freebies) textures and what not as well which I apply in Photoshop.

    I consider myself as doing a rather simple building but dicovering its not just making a box.

    But alas, a little more time, I may add to the thoughts above.

    Cheers,
    Brad
  9. J.L.

    J.L. Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Perhaps I am ancient in my thinking, but a logical step to begin when modelling a building is at the drafting board. The computer and its associated software programs have made the drafting T-square, scale and triangle museum pieces. However, the tactile experiences of measuring and scaling are very important.
    I have mentioned this before, but when I put an addition on my home, I made a scale model of the existing building first. There's a lot of learning and pleasure in scaling a 6' 8" door or 30' wall on the drafting board into a tidy little model. For me, making a model of the actual building made the addition rooflines and elevations fall into place.
    You really start to think in scale when you work with actual dimensions.
    J.L.
  10. J.L.

    J.L. Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Perhaps I am ancient in my thinking, but a logical step to begin when modelling a building is at the drafting board. The computer and its associated software programs have made the drafting T-square, scale and triangle museum pieces. However, the tactile experiences of measuring and scaling are very important.
    I have mentioned this before, but when I put an addition on my home, I made a scale model of the existing building first. There's a lot of learning and pleasure in scaling a 6' 8" door or 30' wall on the drafting board into a tidy little model. For me, making a model of the actual building made the addition rooflines and elevations fall into place.
    You really start to think in scale when you work with actual dimensions.
    J.L.
  11. bholderman

    bholderman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
    J.L.,

    Don't take me wrong, I dust didn't get into drafting and architecture (no, I'm not an architect) unitl after computers came along, so 99.9% of experience is on the digital side. But there is a lot of stuff that I still do freehand with a ruler, triangle, etc. I don't knock your skills or approach at all.

    However, I do have one question from the digital perspective (no sarcasm is implied, just honestly curious), how would you texture/color a paper model from freehand, from a media perspective?

    Cheers,
    Brad
  12. bholderman

    bholderman Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    240
    Likes Received:
    0
    J.L.,

    Don't take me wrong, I dust didn't get into drafting and architecture (no, I'm not an architect) unitl after computers came along, so 99.9% of experience is on the digital side. But there is a lot of stuff that I still do freehand with a ruler, triangle, etc. I don't knock your skills or approach at all.

    However, I do have one question from the digital perspective (no sarcasm is implied, just honestly curious), how would you texture/color a paper model from freehand, from a media perspective?

    Cheers,
    Brad
  13. GEEDUBBYA

    GEEDUBBYA Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0
    Howdy Brad, everyone,

    Well, if JL doesnt mind I would like to field atleast part of your question Brad.
    I majored in commercial art/advertising in college, and really "blew a career" in that field when I wnet to work for a copper wire facvtory which offered more money starting out.
    But, freehand frawing, be it texturing or coloring was all I knew back then.....that was the way things were done. Now I am only 41, but, back in the 80's computers werent as prominent as they are now. I used to amaze classmates in highschool with "drawn" textures, textures that appeared as 3d, giving the illusion you could lift someting off of a page. One good example of the type of "texture" I am speaking of is camo used by hunters.
    I camo rifles, shotguns 4 wheelers etc for ppl I work with, and although I now use my airbrush to do so, I used to do it strictly by hand.
    REALTREE© camo is one shining example of graphic textures that fool the eye into thinking what you are seeing is actually a "texture", but its not a texture at all, its a flat image and albeit this camo is now done with computers, it can be, and I have often done it by hand.
    The "appearnce" of texture is achieved by shading, using various tones of the same and other colors to give the illusion of depth, consistancy, or other visual "illusions". It can also be created or augmented by the use of different styles of painting or drawing. I am sure we have all seen the drawings by ppl using only dots to creat a picture, or drawings made by "cross hatching" (diagonal lines intersecting with each other).
    Anyway, I could go on and on, I know there are atleast 8 yrs of art studies that I did to be able to do it, but we dont have space here for all of that.
    I hope that you understand what I meant and hope this partially answers your question.

    have a good day,


    Greg aka GW
  14. GEEDUBBYA

    GEEDUBBYA Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    852
    Likes Received:
    0
    Howdy Brad, everyone,

    Well, if JL doesnt mind I would like to field atleast part of your question Brad.
    I majored in commercial art/advertising in college, and really "blew a career" in that field when I wnet to work for a copper wire facvtory which offered more money starting out.
    But, freehand frawing, be it texturing or coloring was all I knew back then.....that was the way things were done. Now I am only 41, but, back in the 80's computers werent as prominent as they are now. I used to amaze classmates in highschool with "drawn" textures, textures that appeared as 3d, giving the illusion you could lift someting off of a page. One good example of the type of "texture" I am speaking of is camo used by hunters.
    I camo rifles, shotguns 4 wheelers etc for ppl I work with, and although I now use my airbrush to do so, I used to do it strictly by hand.
    REALTREE© camo is one shining example of graphic textures that fool the eye into thinking what you are seeing is actually a "texture", but its not a texture at all, its a flat image and albeit this camo is now done with computers, it can be, and I have often done it by hand.
    The "appearnce" of texture is achieved by shading, using various tones of the same and other colors to give the illusion of depth, consistancy, or other visual "illusions". It can also be created or augmented by the use of different styles of painting or drawing. I am sure we have all seen the drawings by ppl using only dots to creat a picture, or drawings made by "cross hatching" (diagonal lines intersecting with each other).
    Anyway, I could go on and on, I know there are atleast 8 yrs of art studies that I did to be able to do it, but we dont have space here for all of that.
    I hope that you understand what I meant and hope this partially answers your question.

    have a good day,


    Greg aka GW
  15. J.L.

    J.L. Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Brad,
    Your question is well founded. Greg, you 'illustrate' the skills of handwork well.
    I think I was meaning that as a starting point, the physical and tactile beginnings of layout work are invaluable in starting an architectural model. Once the parameters have been set however, the digital work would take over. In the example of modelling my house, there was only horizontal clapboard siding to draw. Not much texture there.
    There were not many personal computers back then. Ouch...I'm old!
    Cheers...J.L.
  16. J.L.

    J.L. Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2004
    Messages:
    126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Brad,
    Your question is well founded. Greg, you 'illustrate' the skills of handwork well.
    I think I was meaning that as a starting point, the physical and tactile beginnings of layout work are invaluable in starting an architectural model. Once the parameters have been set however, the digital work would take over. In the example of modelling my house, there was only horizontal clapboard siding to draw. Not much texture there.
    There were not many personal computers back then. Ouch...I'm old!
    Cheers...J.L.