Another Card Weight Question

Discussion in 'General Card Modeling' started by RichBohlman, Nov 10, 2006.

  1. RichBohlman

    RichBohlman Railroad Card Modaler

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    Working on a card model and the instruction say:

    Medium Card .040" - What is this in Lbs?

    Heavy Card .080" - What is this in Lbs?

    Thanks for the help - Rich
  2. Larry Marshall

    Larry Marshall Member

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    You may be able to buy bristol board in these thicknesses but these sort of exceed the normal paper charts. If you consider that 65-100lb stock we talk about all the time is .008-.009" thick, you can get to those thicknesses by simply laminating 5-8 sheets to get those thicknesses. For what it's worth, 100lb Strathmore Bristol board is .012-.013" thick.

    Cheers --- Larry
  3. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Check this site out:

    http://www.paper-paper.com/weight.html

    The chart helps................. just remember that BOND is what typing paper is when you buy a pack of 8.5 x 11 from Wal-Mart.

    Offset is a printing term mostly used in print shops and the paper weight is based on a bigger sheet.

    so example from the chart, plain old typing paper is all of the below:

    20# Bond
    50# Offset
    28# Cover
    46# Tag
    42# Index
    3.8 Points
    .0038 inches
    .097 Millimeters
    75.2 gsm

    All of these describe for one person or another plain old (cheap) typing paper.

    And Larry is right I even forget that we can glue up our own thickness if you have a good caliper to use to determine the thick of te paper you want to use.

    john
  4. Gil

    Gil Active Member

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  5. Bowdenja

    Bowdenja Active Member

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    Thanks Gil, the pair I have are a little loose and these look very good!

    Sure glad we got a store in our area!

    john
  6. Jim Nunn

    Jim Nunn Member

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    The weight of paper/card stock is an indication of the density of the paper/card stock not the thickness. 67 lb card averages .008 inches while 110 lb stock averages a tad more then .009 inches.

    This is the best method to make thicker card stock but remember the glue will add another .002 to .003 inches per application, 4 sheets of 67 lb card stock will be very close to .040 inches. Use 3M Super 77 spray glue it will not cause the card stock to worp.

    Jim Nunn
  7. RichBohlman

    RichBohlman Railroad Card Modaler

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    Once Again, THANKS! for all the help! Rich
  8. DrBill

    DrBill Member

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    .040" is about 1 mm, and .080" is 2 mm. If this is backing for rigid parts like bulkheads, you can use the cardboard on a strong writing tablet. The other alternative is to go to your local art supply store or framing shop and buy artist's poster board or smooth matting of the appropriate thickness. To get .040" by laminating normal card stock, you'd have to glue together about 5 sheets; and that can cause problems with flexibility and delamination after assembly. One sheet of 1 mm or 2 mm poster board costs just a couple of bucks and contains enough material to last a lifetime.