A small loco shed for a railroad museum

Discussion in 'Scratchin' & Bashin'' started by modelsof1900, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. modelsof1900

    modelsof1900 Member

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    These days I started a small project because we need a small shed for my friend's steam loco museum. The very old steam locos like John Bull and The DeWitt Clinton must have a roof for showing in the exhibition.

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    I made this small sketch ...

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    ... the side walls are under construction …

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    … and first elements are ready for mounting.

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    Trusses are built ...

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    ... and so I could mount a house - but rather a shed.

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    Step by step ...

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    ... and the framework is ready …

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    … including lighting.

    I added planking to (one) frontside ...

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    ... and side planking and added a small part of roof sheeting ...

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    ... and now I stopped my project here.

    My friend asked whether I will hide the whole framework behind roof and planking?
    No, I don’t continue this because the models should be visible for guests and visitors and I think that the framework is also a good looking part of this small museum equipment.

    But I will like to do a few additional detailing and coloring.

    The plywood of the roof segments shall be basic sheeting and I will add on it a small part with shingles documenting the finite state of the roof.
    However what for a color have shingles? I have seen such wood in the typical weathered gray color; but I do not like to add yet more gray parts to the model. Can I use a red color imitating redwood shingles or such shingles made from red cedar?

    And second - Can I give the frame posts a more yellow-ochre–creamy color as contrast to the green wall sheeting?

    What do you think? I started with a gray colored stripwood documenting an old and restored railroad building using old materials and now doing this the model made a gray and dull impression without the hoped renovated and fresh view. Do you have an idea?

    Bernhard
  2. Jim Krause

    Jim Krause Active Member

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    What do I think? I think you are doing a great job. I happen to like board by board models. I also tend to like the decrepit, well used, under maintained look. Maybe a bit of smoke in the rafters and some gray on the lower portion of the uprights. New cedar shingles are a red-brown color but they eventually turn to a gray color or if in a damp climate they will get blackish with moss on the side away from the sun.
  3. 60103

    60103 Pooh Bah

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    I've see a shed like that in Cadillac, Michigan, over a Shay. I don't think it has the side sheeting, just roof. If I remember, the supports are about tie colour; not sure about the roof. It's not quite high enough to get good photos of the loco.
  4. nkp174

    nkp174 Active Member

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    Love the lights!

    I also enjoy the attention to the truss work. A few years ago I was working on a design for an engine house on my old HO pike. While I never built it, I did design the trusses. I don't recall exactly what loadings I used, other than that I designed it for a heavy snow load, wind loads, and a few factors of safety. I only built one truss, a fink truss. It's sitting in a box upstairs waiting for the rest of the trusses.

    Perhaps the roofing/siding is off because the building is undergoing maintenance! Therefore, there is an excuse to add some LPP to the scene!
  5. ulf999

    ulf999 Member

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    Excellent! It looks perfect with those lights!
  6. modelsof1900

    modelsof1900 Member

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    The roofer has closed his job ...

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    ... and is on the way to McDonalds, I think.
    So I must give the model in this non-ready condition to my friend and visitors of model railraod exhibition (opening this Friday already) will see this "building" as "under construction".

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    A small detail - my roof with mahagony shingles.

    Sorry Jim, I have given the uprights an ocher finish. I don't like to use gray colors.

    Bernhard
  7. nkp174

    nkp174 Active Member

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    Awesome! Das ist cool!
  8. tetters

    tetters Rail Spiking Fool!

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    Sweet! So awesome.

    Bernhard. You mind giving us/me some info on the interior lighting? I'd like to know how you did it.

    BTW - The roofer may want to check his ladder...its a little close to the edge there! :eek:
  9. Jim Krause

    Jim Krause Active Member

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    Better tell that roofer to watch the bottom step.
  10. modelsof1900

    modelsof1900 Member

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    Preparations for getting the shed to its place in museum.

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    Small footings are set in two lines for upright posts to the scene. These are small hard wood dowels wherein I drilled relatively wide holes. I did not form the holes to a squarish profile. See the next pictures; this work is not need fully.

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    Two of the footings (the first both of left line in picture above) are equipped with small brass strips for lighting.

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    First time the shed has got its place however the locos are missed yet. Tomorrow with opening of our exhibition than the old time model locomotives will have a roof, at last.

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    A view inside underneath the roof shows the simple princip of lighting. I installed parallel to middle beams two thin wires (nickel silver wire) over whole lenght of house where all lamps are soldered in a parallel circuit.

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    Here you see the two feedings (also thin nickel silver wire) comming from post right and the second post half left which are go directly to parallel wires in frame work of roof.

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    And this the last picture - the thin wire of uprights at one foot end bent to a small spring. The wire is fixed inside of post by the thinner post strengthening and not one of visitors can see a piece of electrical power supply of this model. The wires get electrically contact when the shed is set in footings and lighting should work when the two footings are connected to a electric system.
    Unfortunately this is a part which is not implemented in this first time presentation of my friend's small steam loco museum. But a next exhibition will follow and a few more improvements than will be realized.

    I hope for understanding of my explanation and if it should not be understandable than I beg pardon.

    Bernhard
  11. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    SUPER MEGA WoW...!!!! :eek:

    You'll excuse my lack of enthusiasm....:mrgreen:

    This is one of the best "How I did it" by far...!! (Don't mean to knock anyone, but....)

    I have taken the liberty of copying all your pictures as they will be invaluable when I undertake the building of a roundouse for my engines....

    Now just a couple (or 3) questions..

    What did you use for lightbulbs and the lampshades..?
    Where can I find nickel silver wire..and what gauge is it..? Did you drill teeny holes to pass the wire through the trusses..?
    Last...Would this type of construction be used in a "fully-sheated" wall..?

    This little gem doesn't belong in a museum model...It belongs in a model museum...!!!:thumb:
  12. nkp174

    nkp174 Active Member

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    I love your system of hiding the wiring. Using plain (uninsulated) Nickel Silver rod is a brilliant choice!
  13. tetters

    tetters Rail Spiking Fool!

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    Nice. I like how tidy everything is. One of my goals is to have working lights on my layout that I can section off...flood lights for the yard for night ops, engine shed, industries...my layout is going to be a 24/7 branchline.

    So....would you then wire the contacts in the foundation to a terminal strip connected to a power supply? As much as I like seeing the models, I love seeing the guts of how things are connected and wired to work.
  14. modelsof1900

    modelsof1900 Member

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    Thanks all for your honoring answers.

    Our exhibition is a great success; unfortunately I don't have enough time for publishing them in these days. Starting with Monday I have a week vacation time and after pictures will follow.

    Short answers.

    @steamhead,
    I have used Viessmann 16 volts mini bulbs with smallest diameter, I think 1/16 inch. Viessmann is an German producer for street lights, signals and semaphores. Unfortunately Vissmann products are not listed by Walthers. For other dealers see here.

    The lampshades are made from ordinary paper. Cut a circle of paper and make a cut from center to edge. Form a flat cone and glue the overlapping paper together. Make a small hole into cone in center until the cone slides over the bulb. Fix the cone by a drop of AC-glue in wised position as a lampshade and color the overside of lampshade including the bulb with a dull black color (or glossy if you wish). Ready.

    My nickel silver wire (in German Neusilber Draht) is a product of a maker in Liechtenstein/Europe. Unfortunately he has not an English website, sorry.

    I think you can use this construction also for fully sheated walls. You will get a few mor stability for the upright posts.
    However I have with my open construction a small bit more flexibility when the posts are plugged in the footing holes. You will get more stability with a fully sheated building and footings must be very exactly positionod for a plug in without big power and without destroying of your work. And watch please. When you needed big power for inserting posts into footings you will need more power for unpluging.

    @tetters,
    a working lighting is planned until next ehibition and there will be a few more iluminated items like a big station clock, station lamps and a few future buildings, at least one fine future model.

    I hope for correct answers to your questions.

    Edit: Sorry, all my models are built in HO scale.

    Bernhard
  15. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    Bernhard - Thanks for the information. I will try to locate suppliers for the NS wire, and your observations regarding the footings will be taken into account.

    I can't wait to see the photos of your exhibit..!! Have a good vacation..!!
  16. modelsof1900

    modelsof1900 Member

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    I think I should add a few shots taken while our exhibition in February here in Dresden/Germany.

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    If you will like to see a few more pictures of our exhibition click for my "museum thread".

    Bernhard