A Fall Sunday Walk-Scopin' Out the Tracks

Discussion in 'The Real Thing- North America' started by AndyWS, Oct 16, 2006.

  1. AndyWS

    AndyWS Member

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    I've been hearing train horns from campus with no idea where exactly they're coming from for the last 2 school years, so I decided to spend a free Sunday afternoon on what will probably be one of the last nice days of the season to take a walk and locate the railroad tracks.

    I found them about 1 1/2-2 miles south of campus (they curve north and south quite a bit, so it varies). It is the only track in the area, so it must be the source of the horns. It is a branch line from Green Bay to Luxemburg, which was originally built by the Kewaunee, Green Bay and Western Railroad and extended all the way east to Kewaunee. The segment from Luxemburg east to Kewaunee is now abandoned. After KGB&W, the line belonged to Wisconsin Central LTD and now Canadian National.

    No trains came by, but I managed some scenic photography of the tracks and crossing signs with the help of the late-afternoon sun.

    Huron Road, looking south. I was rather surprised to find this four-lane, divided roadway guarded only by crossbucks:

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    Closer to the crossing:

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    Looking east:

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    Looking west:

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    East crossbuck, looking north:

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    West crossbuck, looking north:

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    Northview Road, looking south. A quaint rural crossing :) :

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    Someone or something has roughed up the east crossbuck:

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    Looking southwest. The tracks cross the road at a SW-NE angle. The next crossing to the southwest is Courier Road.

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    Looking northeast. The next crossing is Humboldt Road.

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    Humboldt Road, looking south:

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    Looking northeast. Humboldt Road runs NW-SE at this point so the SW-NE running tracks cross it at a perfect 90 degrees. The track on the left is a siding that dead-ends in the pile of dirt.

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    The west signal, looking south. These signals appear to be quite new with LED lights and an electronic bell. CN has been quite adament about modernizing their crossing systems, even on seldom-used rural branch lines such as this. I prefer WSOR which upgrades only when necessary, leaving lots of mechanical bells and pedastel-mounted gates and even a wigwag here and there.

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    The east signal, again looking south:

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  2. Chessie6459

    Chessie6459 Gauge Oldtimer

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    Great Photo's. Thanks for sharing them with us.:thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
  3. liven_letdie

    liven_letdie Member

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    Doesn't exempt usually mean a line is abandoned? I have been waiting for my NWP to be non exempt for quite some time now. Keep looking and the crossing and maybe something will happen!!!sign1 BTW Really nice and clear pics!
  4. brakie

    brakie Active Member

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    Great track modeling pictures! Did you note the lack of a more "normal" looking roadbed?

    I suspect this is a industrial branch line that begs to be modeled.

    Thanks for sharing.:D
  5. AndyWS

    AndyWS Member

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    "Exempt" can mean a line is abandoned, but usually doesn't. It means that vehicles that usually have to stop and scan the crossing-school buses, hazardous materials trucks etc, don't have to stop. I see it more often used at crossings right next to road intersections, on divided roadways (such as Huron Road in the pictures) and other areas where stopping would dangerously impede the flow of traffic.

    According to the FRA website, this line has 2 trains per day (probably the same one, running to and from Luxemburg).

    I don't know if this is the practice in other parts of the country, but in Wisconsin when a line is abandoned and the tracks/signals are left in place (which is rare, most are converted to bike trails almost immediately), the signs put up actually say "abandoned".

    http://www.whrc-wi.org/ICG-Removal/images/icmadison4.jpg
  6. liven_letdie

    liven_letdie Member

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    Wow, learn something new every day:thumb: In california i have never seen an abandoned sign just the exempts. It makes sense to me what you said about the buses and such not having to stop now. There is one industrial branch that I have seen that has only one crossing that is used like once a month even in the busy season and it is labeled exempt so I would guess that you are right. Good to know!

    Cory