1st complete N scale boxcar weathering job

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by Biased turkey, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    I tried various weathering techniques but without combining them together for a complete weathering job. I took the plunge to make a complete top to bottom job
    1) As suggested by Wayne I airbrushed a diluted ( 1/16) coat of the same original color as the boxcar ( PollyScale GTW blue ). After it dried I toned it down and erased some of it with a Brightboy track cleaner
    2) grimmy-black wash ( kids, always start your weathering job with a black wash )
    3) rust using burnt umber, burnt sienna and raw umber oil paints. The problem with N scale is that the thickness of oil paints is too thick for N scale so after the paint dried I sanded it with a 1500 grid sanding paper.
    I used an Xacto tip to try to thin some horizontal rust streaks next to the door ( another problem with N scale, streaks are too wide )
    4) Drybrush brown acrylic on the seams using a piece of sheet styrene with a cut vertical slot as a mask
    5) diluted ( 1/8 ) airspray engine black on boxcar ends and bottom of doors
    6) Diluted ( 1/8 ) airspray L&N gray on the roof edge and the bottom.

    For the trucks:
    1) sideframes were painted with a diluted airspray ( 1/4 ) grimmy black
    2) airsprayed with diluted ( 1/8) roofbrown on gearbox and couplers
    3) painted the whells engine black

    Here is the result:

    Jacques

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  2. steamhead

    steamhead Active Member

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    That looks really good..!!! How diluted is that black wash..?? I've heard several people recommending this...but I'm a little leery about doing it....Did you also use Floquil paint for this..?

    Show us so'more of your work...!!
  3. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    Gus,
    About the wash, I use Polly Scale grimmy-black acrylic paint diluted 1 part paint to 16 parts rubbing alcohol.
    It is very diluted, but I prefer to apply several coats if necessary than to overdo it.
    Believe me it's easy ( it just take 2 minutes ) and just 1 coat or 2 is enough to get rid of that "out of the box " plastic shine but you'll barely be able to see the grim.
    I'll post pictures later of a brand new boxcar before and after the wash.

    Here is a picture of my track cleaning car ( maybe it's overdone )and of a bridge.

    Jacques

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Not bad at all, Jacques. :thumb::thumb: I like your rust colour, but, if I may make a suggestion, I think that it would be even more convincing if it was placed where the steel would be most likely to rust. That would generally be where there's a joint between panels (along the rivet lines) or where another part, such as the door tracks, latches, etc., would be bolted to the car. That's not to say that rust couldn't occur where you've placed it, but most such catastrophic paint failures only occur when a car has been in service a long time, or if damaged by some external force, such as a brush with another car or a forklift. The car roof would be the most likely area to have such rust damage, as that area was most exposed to the weather, especially snow cover. Some roofs were made using galvanised steel and many of these were left unpainted. While the zinc coating helped to prevent rusting, the joints and fasteners were still vulnerable, and galvanised roofs that were painted often saw the paint fail rather quickly, as paint adheres poorly to such a surface. Rust always finds the weakest link.
    Still, I think the car looks good, especially for your first "complete" weathering attempt. :-D

    Wayne
  5. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    Thanks Wayne for taking some of your valuable to reply with encouragement and positive criticism.

    Weathering that 1st boxcar from A to Z was a good experience because
    1) I learned what technique / material works or doesn't
    For example I know now that oil paint thinner brushed on completely dried acrylic paint doesn't remove it.
    2) I'm more aware now of the weathering process and how it is done in real life.
    Thanks to remind me that seams are the most vulnerable spots to rust attack and random rust splotches are not common .
    Maybe I was fascinated by this extreme example:

    [​IMG]


    Jacques
  6. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    Yeah, that certainly is an extreme example! :eek: As I said, I still think your car looks good, and it wouldn't be totally implausible left as is. The best thing though, is that you've gotten past the hardest step in weathering, which is to attempt it in the first place. ;) Now you can enjoy the process of experimenting further, and the results will improve as you do. It's always helpful, too, to have some prototype photos to use as a reference - not necessarily to match them exactly, but as a guide to both the colour and placement of the weathering. I'm sure, too, that we've all seen prototype cars that were so severely weathered, an exact model of them would be considered unbelieveable without a photo of the prototype for comparison.

    Wayne
  7. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    For Gus,
    I said I would post a picture with 2 identical boxcars, 1 having received 1 diluted grimmy black wash and the other none.
    Here is the picture.

    Jacques

    [​IMG]
  8. Herc Driver

    Herc Driver Active Member

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    Very nice job! As a fellow Nscaler and weather'er...I too found it difficult to get the right amount of black wash and rust. That 1500 grit sandpaper is a good idea. (I used an eraser for a while but that didn't work as well as I would have liked.) I have found success with a very diluted black wash (like you) and using chaulks. Specificially, I like using the same color as the car to start, then add lighter colors to cause fading. Finally, I add the rust/grime colors. But I think I'm going to add your sandpaper and Xacto knife technique the next time I weather. I'm still looking for a fool proof way to add just enough rust without over doing it and maybe adding the very light cut marks from the knife with chaulks will do the trick. I really like your weathering - really nice job!
  9. Art Decko

    Art Decko Member

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    Impressive results, Jacques! Hard to believe that's N scale, especially the first photo in the thread. Looks like you successfully solved the rust color formula question. :)
  10. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    Thanks for giving some feedback Herc Driver. Coming from a fellow N Scaler it's even more appreciated.
    I like oil paint for rust because it can be washed, even 24 hours later , with thinner.
    On the other hand oil paint is quite thick . It is very noticeable in N scale and particularly when painting some small dark rust spots.
    I did mine using a 00 paint brush. That's the smallest one that was available.
    Should I get an even smaller one such as a 0000 detail brush ?

    I tried earth tones artist acrylic paints for rust . I didn't like it but I still can't explain why.

    Jacques
  11. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    Thanks for the encouragement Art Decko.
    Yes, weathering in N scale can be tricky. As a matter of fact, anything N scale related is tricky :)
    I was even thinking of using a technique I learned while painting WW2 1/48 plastic airplane models: German camouflage is tricky to paint, so I was making a cardboard mask with the camouflage pattern and airbrushing the thin paint through the mask. A very tedious job believe me.

    I didn't exactly solve my color problem ( yet ) because my problem was how to mix liquid acrylic paints such as Tamiya or railroad Polly Scale acrylics to get the rust color.
    For weathering the boxcar I used earth tones artist oil paints, no mixing required. Right now I'm doing some trials with earth tones artist acrylic ( in tube ) but I'm now facing another proble: how to dilute it.
    It looks like I'll be struggling for the rest of my life with rust.

    Jacques