1st attempt at weathering a boxcar

Discussion in 'Weathering Forum' started by Biased turkey, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    I did a wash using Tamiya acrylic XF-1 flat black ( the one I use for scale airplane modeling ) diluted at the ratio of 1 part paint to 16 parts isopropyl alcoohol.
    I used my track cleaning car for the attempt because the track cleaning car is not permanently on the layout so if the attempt fails no one but me will know about it.
    I purchased the Jeff Wilson's book " Basic painting and weathewring for models railroaders ". ( Kalmbach books ) It's a good reference book.
    I didn't want to overdo the wash so I applied it once.

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  2. Gary S.

    Gary S. Senior Member

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    Hey, that turned out pretty good. Amazing what a simple little wash can do to take away the "brand new" look of a car. Next step will be to paint and weather the trucks and wheels.
  3. UP SD40-2

    UP SD40-2 Senior Member

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    Biased turkey:wave:, i think your box car turned out quite well for your FIRST weathering:thumb:. as Gary mentioned, hit the trucks with some grime and rust;). looks to me like your ready to move on to your regular rolling stock:thumb:. :D -Deano
  4. doctorwayne

    doctorwayne Active Member

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    I agree: not bad at all for your first attempt. :thumb: One thing to watch for when using washes is the tendency for them to collect around raised details, such as cast-on grabirons. You can prevent excess build-up by siphoning off the wash as it collects, using either a brush or the corner of a paper towel. Usually, enough will be left to weather the area without leaving the "rings" around the details. It was also a wise decision to use a light application for your first attempt, as it's much easier to make further applications for a more heavily weathered effect than it is to undo an initial wash that was too concentrated.
    Here are a few photos that I was going to post in a separate thread, but since the final results are barely noticeable, they'll better serve to illustrate what I've just said:

    Regardless of how concentrated your wash is, apply it generously, and let it flow down the carsides.
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    The wash will quickly collect around raised details and along the lower edge of the car.
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    Use a brush or the corner of a paper towel to siphon the excess wash from around the raised details. Remember that as long is the carside remains wet, the wash will continue to migrate towards the places where it initially collected. You may have to repeat the siphoning step several times.
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    Use the brush to siphon the excess wash as it collects along the bottom edge of the car, too. You can experiment with placing the car so that the side being weathered reposes at different angles, to achieve different effects. If the car stands on its wheels, the wash will flow very quickly down the sides; if the car lies flat on its side, the wash will mostly stay where you've put it, although it will still tend to migrate to those raised details.
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    When I'm using washes to depict a more heavily weathered car, I not only make multiple applications of washes (and not always using the same colour), but I also like to vary the way that the car sits as the wash is drying. It may lay flat for 30 seconds or so, then I'll prop it up at 45 degrees for another half-minute, then back onto its wheels until it dries. You still need to stay on top of collecting the excess, especially if it looks as if an adjacent area is beginning to dry. Here are a couple of more heavily-weathered cars. (They also got some airbrush weathering after the washes had dried.
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    Back to the original car. Even though the excess wash was removed in the previous step, it continues to collect, so keep on top of it.
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    Because this particular car is meant to be one that was recently shopped, the effects of the wash were kept to a real minimum: just enough to kill that "brand new" look. Here it is just before starting the airbrush weathering.
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    And here's the finished car, after it was placed in service.
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    I hope this additional info will be of some help with your efforts.

    Wayne
  5. UP SD40-2

    UP SD40-2 Senior Member

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    GREAT advice Wayne(as usual):thumb:. and an EXCELLENT wash tutorial too!:thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
    :D -Deano
  6. Biased turkey

    Biased turkey Active Member

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    I couldn't have said it better :)
    Thanks for the encouragement people.
    I agreee ( I always agree lol ) with DoctorWayne: the accumulation around raised details might be too excessive ( specially with N scale ) so next time I wont forget to siphon off the excess of the wash.

    Next step will be to paint and weather the trucks and wheels. OK Gary S. that will be the next step.
    I'm amazed at what a single wash can do.