1mm cardstock... where in calfornia?

Discussion in 'Ship & Watercraft Models' started by jnyoun, Apr 21, 2007.

  1. jnyoun

    jnyoun Member

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    Hi,

    I was fascinated by the models in this forum and I decided to try myself.
    I am a beginner in this paper modeling, so I am not sure whether I am able to make one, I mean, nice one....:)

    I just purchased a GREMIR HMS onslow. This may be too much for a beginner like me. However, I really liked it.

    Well, once again I have to emphasize that I am a beginer..... because my question may be too dull.

    In fact, I tried to search in this forum to find answer. However, I couldn't get a clear idea. Here comes one beginner's question.

    In making a hull, the thickness of hull looks wide, not regular paper thickness. I read about 'lamination' to make the thickness to be 1mm. Also, I found that there is another way, that is, buying about 1mm cardstock instead of lamination.

    Where can I get a 1mm cardstock?

    I stoped by Micheal's, Office Depot, Wal Mart and Target. Unfortunately, I could not find any THICK paper like this. Where did you guys get a 1mm or 2mm cardstock?

    I will really appreciate your help.

    Thanks

    JN
  2. jnyoun

    jnyoun Member

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    Hi,

    I was fascinated by the models in this forum and I decided to try myself.
    I am a beginner in this paper modeling, so I am not sure whether I am able to make one, I mean, nice one....:)

    I just purchased a GREMIR HMS onslow. This may be too much for a beginner like me. However, I really liked it.

    Well, once again I have to emphasize that I am a beginer..... because my question may be too dull.

    In fact, I tried to search in this forum to find answer. However, I couldn't get a clear idea. Here comes one beginner's question.

    In making a hull, the thickness of hull looks wide, not regular paper thickness. I read about 'lamination' to make the thickness to be 1mm. Also, I found that there is another way, that is, buying about 1mm cardstock instead of lamination.

    Where can I get a 1mm cardstock?

    I stoped by Micheal's, Office Depot, Wal Mart and Target. Unfortunately, I could not find any THICK paper like this. Where did you guys get a 1mm or 2mm cardstock?

    I will really appreciate your help.

    Thanks

    JN
  3. silverw

    silverw Member

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    Hello jnyoun

    Don't ignor the Cornflakes box that sits on your table every morning! Or, all sorts of other "packing material" that normally just gets tossed in the garbage. Also, take a peek in the garbage bins at work... you may just find an endless supply of perfect stuff.
    "One man's garbage is another man's....."

    ....Bill
  4. silverw

    silverw Member

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    Hello jnyoun

    Don't ignor the Cornflakes box that sits on your table every morning! Or, all sorts of other "packing material" that normally just gets tossed in the garbage. Also, take a peek in the garbage bins at work... you may just find an endless supply of perfect stuff.
    "One man's garbage is another man's....."

    ....Bill
  5. rickstef

    rickstef Guest

    Got a legal pad laying around?

    a desk calendar?

    those do work also very nicely

    Rick
  6. rickstef

    rickstef Guest

    Got a legal pad laying around?

    a desk calendar?

    those do work also very nicely

    Rick
  7. shoki2000

    shoki2000 Active Member

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    jnyoun,
    Welcome to the forum and the greates hobby on Earth :grin:
    As silverw stated, collect any cardboard you come accross but don't bother with the corrugated kind since it is not suitable for this purpose.
  8. shoki2000

    shoki2000 Active Member

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    jnyoun,
    Welcome to the forum and the greates hobby on Earth :grin:
    As silverw stated, collect any cardboard you come accross but don't bother with the corrugated kind since it is not suitable for this purpose.
  9. eatcrow2

    eatcrow2 Member

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    Hello JN...

    Here in Santa Monica I've gotten both from artist supplies stores.. The one close to home "Mittels <sp>" has big sheets of it.. There's another in W.L.A somewhere.. So check to see if there is any stores like that in your area .. Give a location of where in Calif. your at, and maybe you can get someone to point out someplace close to you..
  10. eatcrow2

    eatcrow2 Member

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    Hello JN...

    Here in Santa Monica I've gotten both from artist supplies stores.. The one close to home "Mittels <sp>" has big sheets of it.. There's another in W.L.A somewhere.. So check to see if there is any stores like that in your area .. Give a location of where in Calif. your at, and maybe you can get someone to point out someplace close to you..
  11. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Check places that frame pictures and ask for the cast-off pieces of matte board. Some of those places will let you have the pieces for free. Saves them room in the dumpster. A small digital caliper like what you can get from Harbor Freight Tools will help in measuring the thickness.:)
  12. SCEtoAux

    SCEtoAux Member

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    Check places that frame pictures and ask for the cast-off pieces of matte board. Some of those places will let you have the pieces for free. Saves them room in the dumpster. A small digital caliper like what you can get from Harbor Freight Tools will help in measuring the thickness.:)
  13. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Depending on your budget, there are several options. The easiest is to go to www.papermodelstore.com and order it. My latest order included both 1 mm and 2 mm cardboard 11 x 17 sheets of cardboard that looks just perfect for paper modeling (though may raise hell with Xacto blades, as it is pretty dense). I was able to find 0.5 mm cardboard (letter size) at the local print shop at a reasonable price. Before finding those sources, I saved up cerial boxes and coke cartons and laminated to get the needed thickness. Laminating is fairly easy if you don't try doing entire sheets at once. My method is to glue the part pattern to the first layer of cardboard, roughly cut out the part, then glue that to the second layer of cardboard, repeating as needed to get the needed thickness. I normally use a glue stick for laminating, but spray cement also does a fairly good job. It helps to clamp the piece between a couple of flat surfaces (like a stack of books) until the glue is set. If worried about protecting the book covers, sandwich the part in a couple of layers of waxed paper before puting it in the "press."
  14. Darwin

    Darwin Member

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    Depending on your budget, there are several options. The easiest is to go to www.papermodelstore.com and order it. My latest order included both 1 mm and 2 mm cardboard 11 x 17 sheets of cardboard that looks just perfect for paper modeling (though may raise hell with Xacto blades, as it is pretty dense). I was able to find 0.5 mm cardboard (letter size) at the local print shop at a reasonable price. Before finding those sources, I saved up cerial boxes and coke cartons and laminated to get the needed thickness. Laminating is fairly easy if you don't try doing entire sheets at once. My method is to glue the part pattern to the first layer of cardboard, roughly cut out the part, then glue that to the second layer of cardboard, repeating as needed to get the needed thickness. I normally use a glue stick for laminating, but spray cement also does a fairly good job. It helps to clamp the piece between a couple of flat surfaces (like a stack of books) until the glue is set. If worried about protecting the book covers, sandwich the part in a couple of layers of waxed paper before puting it in the "press."
  15. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    There is a great source but you have to go ask. Go to a hospital or outpatient xray facility and ask them for the cardboard backing from the film boxes. This is great, clean and almost exactly 1mm and most important, free! They foolishly throw the stuff out!
  16. cmdrted

    cmdrted Active Member

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    There is a great source but you have to go ask. Go to a hospital or outpatient xray facility and ask them for the cardboard backing from the film boxes. This is great, clean and almost exactly 1mm and most important, free! They foolishly throw the stuff out!
  17. Ron

    Ron Member

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    I found a really cheap supply at the local dry cleaners. The 8x11 sheets they use here when packing shirts are 1mm

    Ron
  18. Ron

    Ron Member

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    I found a really cheap supply at the local dry cleaners. The 8x11 sheets they use here when packing shirts are 1mm

    Ron
  19. cdcoyle

    cdcoyle Member

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    Not trying to hijack this thread or anything, but since we're on the subject of cardboard... I wasn't particularly happy with the stuff I used for Agassiz. It was the stuff printers use for backing scratch pads and such. I found it to be rather flimsy, producing a less-than-rigid hull skeleton. I'm wondering if anyone has tried sheet balsa, or even aircraft plywood, for formers and whether that was a significant improvement, or not worth the extra cost?

    Best,
  20. cdcoyle

    cdcoyle Member

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    Not trying to hijack this thread or anything, but since we're on the subject of cardboard... I wasn't particularly happy with the stuff I used for Agassiz. It was the stuff printers use for backing scratch pads and such. I found it to be rather flimsy, producing a less-than-rigid hull skeleton. I'm wondering if anyone has tried sheet balsa, or even aircraft plywood, for formers and whether that was a significant improvement, or not worth the extra cost?

    Best,